palestinephotos:

مقارنة بين جدار برلين وجدار الفصل العنصري في فلسطين Comparison between Berlin Wall and the israeli apartheid wall in Palestine

palestinephotos:

مقارنة بين جدار برلين وجدار الفصل العنصري في فلسطين 
Comparison between Berlin Wall and the israeli apartheid wall in Palestine

(Source: palestine-first, via makhnovshchina)

888 notes

resident-tofu:

kindnesswillsavetheworld:

veganflowers:

universalequalityisinevitable:

Jacque Fresco, from Zeitgeist: Moving Forward.

I haven’t seen this film so I’m not sure whether it’s okay, but this quote is powerful. And frightening.

^

Everyone should watch this.

(via anar-fem)

3,811 notes

lovesexdevotion:

That was so beautiful

lovesexdevotion:

That was so beautiful

(Source: johto-jordan, via ruinedchildhood)

329,157 notes

"Expecting marginalized people to congratulate you as a white person for not being racist is racist."

atane - Time Management and Anti-Black Racism (via mamie-caro)

(via noscrubs-nomasters)

3,489 notes

ruinedchildhood:

Domino’s knows whats up

ruinedchildhood:

Domino’s knows whats up

25,792 notes

bedelia-bloodyknuckle:

did-you-kno:

Source

Workers with good taste in music. 

bedelia-bloodyknuckle:

did-you-kno:

Source

Workers with good taste in music. 

1,895 notes

(Source: yungbuu, via ruinedchildhood)

6,980 notes

(Source: qualifiedyetsluttynurse, via makhnovshchina)

282 notes

putuksstuff:

Team Rocket announces their scheme to take over this particular electronics store.

putuksstuff:

Team Rocket announces their scheme to take over this particular electronics store.

(Source: fawken, via ruinedchildhood)

51,957 notes

"

Following your interview on Oprah, your comments speaking on “the new black” has been weighing heavily on my mind. Maybe it’s the pure ignorance of your comments that has my mind rattling or maybe it’s because it’s the utter arrogance you have in thinking that you’ve somehow transcended your race. It wasn’t that long ago when I used to distance myself from other black people on the basis that I thought I was different. I thought I had somehow broke the mold because I listened to alternative music and knew what cosplay was. So ignorantly, I put myself into an imaginary sub category.

It wasn’t until this past summer, while watching the George Zimmerman trials and hearing all the hatred being flung in the direction of a dead child and his grieving family who were strangers to many, that the rose colored glasses I had been wearing broke.

It dawned on me that my blackness wasn’t something I could hide behind activities that had been deemed “white”. My skin will always be the first thing that will greet people at the door before my accolades or hobbies could even reach the door mat. So instead of being a part of the problem, I decided to be a part of the solution in destroying the idea that I was a special little snowflakes.


But that hasn’t resonated with you in your forty plus years of life.
You’ve decided to take it upon yourself and create an elite new group of black people that refer to themselves as “the new black”. Your money and success has blinded your consciousness and your empathy for your own race. You’ve decided that you were too good for us and went to extreme lengths to distance yourself.


Blackness isn’t a state mind. It isn’t something that you can market and sell to the multitudes. My skin color isn’t something I have to make work. People’s ignorance and blatant hatred is what I have to navigate through. You say that “the new black” people don’t blame other for their races, so let’s talk about how your comments are holding our race back. My dreams are boundless and doesn’t need erase my race in order to come into fruition.

Sincerely,

A person comfortable in their “old” blackness

"

Open Letter to Pharrell about “The New Black (via bellecosby)

(via theblackcommunist)

379 notes

basedheisenberg:

Real recognizes real.

basedheisenberg:

Real recognizes real.

(Source: ryanhatesthis, via ruinedchildhood)

270,740 notes

"So long as I confine my activities to social service and the blind, they compliment me extravagantly, calling me ‘arch priestess of the sightless,’ ‘wonder woman,’ and a ‘modern miracle.’ But when it comes to a discussion of poverty, and I maintain that it is the result of wrong economics—that the industrial system under which we live is at the root of much of the physical deafness and blindness in the world—that is a different matter! It is laudable to give aid to the handicapped. Superficial charities make smooth the way of the prosperous; but to advocate that all human beings should have leisure and comfort, the decencies and refinements of life, is a Utopian dream, and one who seriously contemplates its realization indeed must be deaf, dumb, and blind."

Helen Keller (letter to Senator Robert La Follette, 1924)

funny how the most popular narrative about helen keller is a harmless little girl who learns to communicate and then the story ends for some reason gee i wonder why that is

(via callmeoutis)

NINETEEN
TWENTY
FOUR.

(via pearlsnapbutton)

Also an IWW member whose books were burnt by the nazis.

“The few own the many because they possess the means of livelihood of all … The country is governed for the richest, for the corporations, the bankers, the land speculators, and for the exploiters of labor. The majority of mankind are working people. So long as their fair demands - the ownership and control of their livelihoods - are set at naught, we can have neither men’s rights nor women’s rights. The majority of mankind is ground down by industrial oppression in order that the small remnant may live in ease.” — Helen Keller, 1911

(Source: jinnigan, via deaths-praises)

1,769 notes

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via nooneescapesthereddeath)

8,569 notes

marxvx:

Alabama Prisoners to Strike on Easter Sunday
Building on the mass hunger strike of prisoners in Pelican Bay State Prison in July of last year, several hundred prisoners across Alabama have declared that, beginning Easter Sunday, they will stop prison-mandated labor in protest of detestable living conditions.
The conditions in Alabama prisons are horrendous, packing twice as many people as the 16,000 that can be housed “humanely”, with everything from black mold, brown water, cancer causing foods, insect infestations, and general disrepair. They are also run by free slave labor, with 10,000 incarcerated people working to maintain the prisons daily, adding up to $600,000 dollars a day, or $219,000,000 a year of slave labor if inmates were paid federal minimum wage, with tens of thousands more receiving pennies a day making products for the state or private corporations.
Unpaid labor includes cooking and cleaning, production of license plates, furniture, chemicals, and linens, and farming. The slavery analogy is more than metaphorical: African-Americans comprise only 26% of Alabama’s population, but make up more than 60% of the prison population due to reactionary legislation and racist targeting of communities of color. Reports of beatings and systemic rape and sexual abuse of women inmates by guards at Tutwiler State Prison have surfaced in the media over the last year.
(In the US, forced labor produces everything from military equipment to lingerie, school supplies, and food.)
On the outside, labor unions and prisoners’ advocacy groups have been instrumental in helping prisoners organize themselves. The Free Alabama Movement is pushing an “Education, Rehabilitation, and Re-entry Preparedness Bill” to the Alabama legislature, while the Industrial Workers of the World labor union has vowed to provide support and assistance to the incarcerated laborers.
Melvin Ray, spokesperson for the Free Alabama Movement (FAM) said:

When we look at our situations inside of the Alabama Department of Corrections, we have no choice but to engage in this nonviolent and peaceful protest for civil and human rights. We sleep with rats and roaches. We work for free and eat slop unfit for human consumption. We serve decades in prison solely to provide free labor and without any real prospect for parole, and without any recourse to the courts for justice or redress of grievances. Our mothers, wives, and daughters must expose their breasts and panties just to visit us. This should not be acceptable to anyone. Prison is supposed to be a place where people go to work out issues and return to society. But when there is no focus on education or rehab but solely on profit margins, human suffering is inevitable. ADOC is about free labor and the new slavery no one wants to talk about. That is no longer going to work for the 30,000 of us who suffer because of it.

The Industrial Workers of the World was involved in a similar campaign in 1987, in which they organized 400 incarcerated laborers in an Ohio state prison, before the government ruled that prisoners are not legally entitled to the right to form a union - a right which all other workers enjoy.

marxvx:

Alabama Prisoners to Strike on Easter Sunday

Building on the mass hunger strike of prisoners in Pelican Bay State Prison in July of last year, several hundred prisoners across Alabama have declared that, beginning Easter Sunday, they will stop prison-mandated labor in protest of detestable living conditions.

The conditions in Alabama prisons are horrendous, packing twice as many people as the 16,000 that can be housed “humanely”, with everything from black mold, brown water, cancer causing foods, insect infestations, and general disrepair. They are also run by free slave labor, with 10,000 incarcerated people working to maintain the prisons daily, adding up to $600,000 dollars a day, or $219,000,000 a year of slave labor if inmates were paid federal minimum wage, with tens of thousands more receiving pennies a day making products for the state or private corporations.

Unpaid labor includes cooking and cleaning, production of license plates, furniture, chemicals, and linens, and farming. The slavery analogy is more than metaphorical: African-Americans comprise only 26% of Alabama’s population, but make up more than 60% of the prison population due to reactionary legislation and racist targeting of communities of color. Reports of beatings and systemic rape and sexual abuse of women inmates by guards at Tutwiler State Prison have surfaced in the media over the last year.

(In the US, forced labor produces everything from military equipment to lingerie, school supplies, and food.)

On the outside, labor unions and prisoners’ advocacy groups have been instrumental in helping prisoners organize themselves. The Free Alabama Movement is pushing an “Education, Rehabilitation, and Re-entry Preparedness Bill” to the Alabama legislature, while the Industrial Workers of the World labor union has vowed to provide support and assistance to the incarcerated laborers.

Melvin Ray, spokesperson for the Free Alabama Movement (FAM) said:

When we look at our situations inside of the Alabama Department of Corrections, we have no choice but to engage in this nonviolent and peaceful protest for civil and human rights. We sleep with rats and roaches. We work for free and eat slop unfit for human consumption. We serve decades in prison solely to provide free labor and without any real prospect for parole, and without any recourse to the courts for justice or redress of grievances. Our mothers, wives, and daughters must expose their breasts and panties just to visit us. This should not be acceptable to anyone. Prison is supposed to be a place where people go to work out issues and return to society. But when there is no focus on education or rehab but solely on profit margins, human suffering is inevitable. ADOC is about free labor and the new slavery no one wants to talk about. That is no longer going to work for the 30,000 of us who suffer because of it.

The Industrial Workers of the World was involved in a similar campaign in 1987, in which they organized 400 incarcerated laborers in an Ohio state prison, before the government ruled that prisoners are not legally entitled to the right to form a union - a right which all other workers enjoy.

203 notes